A wrap passport

It’s a statement of fact that wraps travel many miles during their lifespans. It’s rare, as churners will attest, for a wrap to be bought new and stay forever with its original purchaser. Instead it may go through two, three, four, more hands before it stays  on its final shelf or gets chopped for other uses. 

I have sent many wraps on their way, some sold or traded on, some sent on travelling journeys such as the Sjala linen wrap between countries or some wrap favourites that pop out to visit friends around the country. They’re special things, wraps, made with beautiful fibres and produced in limited quantities so it makes sense for a wrap to give the pleasure of carrying as many children as possible.

I have often wondered when a secondhand wrap comes to me what its journey has been; who bought it? Who has it carried? Where has it been? Wrap Track deserves a special mention here because it’s a website designed to collate and document your collection and to then pass a wrap on to the next owner through its unique ID. What a great idea. 

Preview of the Wrap passport pages
It’s also a statement of fact that I am forgetful and so my Wrap Track is hopelessly out of date. This prompted me to create some wrap passports. They’re in PDF format and can be printed two to a page landscape format and double sided. This creates a little booklet where you can write it’s name, size, first owner details, the country is started in and the age of its first wrappee. There are subsequent pages for later owners to add their details. 

So if you’re as forgetful as me but you’d like to pass on a wrap’s history you’re welcome to download and print your own wrap passport.

This conversation originally happened in the AP and Beyond group so this version has the AP logo.

You can also download this generic version for any wrap brand.

Huge thank you to Merje, wrapping friend and design whizz (The Most Jam) who recommended an app called Canva that I used to make the passport. 

Happy travels. 

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